Apple
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On Some Websites, iOS 16 will Enable You Avoid CAPTCHAs.

You might not need to tap images or type in weird words.

You might be able to check in to some websites without using CAPTCHA thanks to iOS 16’s anti-bot features. According to MacRumors, Apple revealed a Private Access Token mechanism in iOS 16, iPadOS 16, and macOS Ventura at WWDC 2022 that completely eliminates CAPTCHAs for specific apps and websites. When you enable automatic verification, supporting websites will utilize iCloud to authenticate your Apple ID and your device, providing a token that demonstrates your reliability. It’s possible that proving your humanity won’t require you to type incomprehensible words or tap images of stop signs.

Apple stated that its products won’t reveal private information associated with your account (such as the email address or phone number). Additionally, the company won’t be able to link these checks to individual suppliers because it won’t know who is requesting the verification. Because it doesn’t record your IP address, the token system is promoted as being more considerate of privacy. By enabling more persons with disabilities to use CAPTCHA-verified websites, it may help increase accessibility.

Significantly, the technique might easily experience broad adoption beyond Apple hardware. The token approach may be made available to millions of websites thanks to plans already made public by Cloudflare and Fastly to implement it. Additionally, Apple collaborated with these businesses and Google to develop an open standard for Private Access Tokens. Although there isn’t yet a direct Android equivalent, the technology in iOS 16 suggests that CAPTCHAs won’t be as frequently required in the future.

According to Apple, even though your Apple ID is used as proof of identification, neither your smartphone nor your computer or laptop will transmit the data associated with it (such as an email address or contact number).

Captcha is just a fancy way of saying that your device is trying to figure out whether you are a real person or a computer hacker or tech. Apple Internet Technologies CEO Tommy Pauly demonstrates in a video how site challenges like CAPTCHA (Completely Automated Public Turing Test to Tell Computers and Humans Apart) can occasionally impose restrictions on real individuals with disabilities. Private Access Tokens, introduced in iOS 16 and macOS Ventura, are what allow servers to automatically trust clients, according to the video.

The new features are added to a long list of iOS and macOS technologies already in use to enable secure website browsing for users. Apple had already released Private Relay and Hide My Email.

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