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Next Week, iOS 15.4 will be Released, allowing you to use Face ID with a Mask.

The Long-Awaited Universal Control Functionality will be Available for Macs and iPads as well.

Five beta versions of iOS 15.4 were released, including AirTag anti-stalking alerts, a gender-neutral Siri voice option, new emoji, Face ID upgrades, and the long-awaited debut of Universal Control. The public beta of iOS 15.4 has now been released, and a final version of the operating system will be available as a free upgrade next week, preloaded on the new green iPhone 13 and iPhone 13 Pro, as well as the current iPhone SE.

iOS 15.4 is the fourth significant upgrade to iOS 15, which was released in September with the iPhone 13. These updates, which began with iOS 15.1 in December, have added new capabilities and upgraded old ones to Apple’s iPhone operating system. Following iOS 15.3.1, which was published last month to address a security vulnerability in iPhones and iPads, iOS 15.4 will be launched.

Apple has stated that iOS 15.4 will be released next week. Another technique to unlock your device with Face ID while wearing a mask will be available to iPhone users in the coming days. Without removing your mask or entering in your passcode, you won’t need an Apple Watch to unlock your phone.

Since January, Apple has been testing the functionality in public betas. In the Face ID & Passcode area of Settings, you’ll need to manually activate it. There’s one catch: it won’t work if you’re wearing sunglasses.

Other changes predicted in iOS 15.4 include an anti-stalking warning for AirTags, a less-gendered Siri voice option, PS5 DualSense controller adaptive trigger compatibility, the ability to make notes to iCloud Keychain passwords, and a slew of new emoji.

Next week will also see the release of macOS Monterey 12.3 and iPadOS 15.4. The long-awaited Universal Handle feature will be included in those upgrades, allowing you to control numerous Macs and iPads with a single keyboard, trackpad, or mouse. Universal Control was announced at WWDC in June, but it was postponed from the fall to this spring.

We recommend installing the beta on a tester device rather than your personal iPhone, as with any operating system beta. Beta releases are designed to test for stability and bugs, which means they aren’t as well-optimized as release versions, which means you’ll likely get less battery life and app instability.

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